Formula 1 2022: Aston Martin and McLaren car launches live on Sky Sports F1 as new season approaches

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Red Bull kicks off F1’s first ‘launch week’ if 2022 on Wednesday ahead of the launches of Aston Martin and McLaren, both live on Sky Sports F1 and streamed on Sky F1’s YouTube and Facebook; Watch the Aston Martin reveal at 2 p.m. Thursday, McLaren at 7 p.m. Friday

Last update: 07/02/22 06:00

Formula 1 2022 is gearing up to take off this week as three teams prepare to debut the cars that face the sport’s rules revolution, with new looks and opportunities for the coming season.

After Haas kicked off the new era with a livery reveal on Friday, ‘Launch Season’ now has its first launch week – with the added bonus of Aston Martin and McLaren car unveils live on Sky Sports F1!

Three consecutive days of car launches begin on Wednesday like Red Bull reveal the RB18 machine in which Max Verstappen hopes to retain his title, with a virtual reveal scheduled on their social media at 4 p.m.

At Thusday, Aston Martin will unveil its second car since returning to F1 – and you can watch it live on Sky Sports F1.

The show, from the company’s headquarters in Gaydon, begins at 2 p.m.. It will be shown live on the Sky Sports F1 TV channel as well as Sky Sports F1’s YouTube and Facebook, with extensive coverage on Sky Sports’ digital platforms.

    Haas unveiled a first look at a 2022 car with livery on Friday

Haas unveiled a first look at a 2022 car with livery on Friday

If last year is anything to go by – with Daniel Craig and Tom Brady among the celebrities making an appearance at Aston’s 2021 launch – their next reveal is not to be missed.

It is then the turn of McLaren to Friday and again you can watch it live on Sky Sports F1.

Lando Norris and Daniel Ricciardo’s new car will be unveiled at 7 p.m., the event – which McLaren is using to launch its four racing programs for 2022 (F1, IndyCar, Extreme E and Esports) – is taking place at the team’s MTC base in Woking.

Like Aston Martin, it will be shown live on Sky Sports F1 TV channel, YouTube and Facebook.

When are the new cars unveiled?

February 4 Haas (livery reveal)
February 9 Red Bull
February 10 Aston Martin
February 11th McLaren
February 14th Alpha Tauri
February 17 Ferrari
February 18 mercedes
the 21st of February Alpine
February 27 Alfa Romeo
Williams TBC

What to expect after Haas launches the all-new era of F1

Haas unveiled a first look at the new F1 cars on Friday with digital images of their VF22.

Although the car looked different in the first pre-season test on February 23, it was still a radical departure from last year’s challenger thanks to new aerodynamic concepts.

The design, mandated by F1 to improve wheel-to-wheel racing and the sport’s competitiveness, has been described as the biggest technical overhaul in four decades, with teams having to change their cars from the ground up.

Mercedes Technical Director James Allison explains in detail the challenges ahead as Formula 1 prepares for one of the biggest rule and car changes in history.

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Mercedes Technical Director James Allison explains in detail the challenges ahead as Formula 1 prepares for one of the biggest rule and car changes in history.

Mercedes Technical Director James Allison explains in detail the challenges ahead as Formula 1 prepares for one of the biggest rule and car changes in history.

That being said, Red Bull will still enter the season as one of the heavy favorites as they look to build on a year that has seen them battle Mercedes fiercely throughout, with Verstappen eventually edging out Lewis Hamilton for the crown. pilots.

Aston Martin and McLaren, meanwhile, have long-term aspirations to move from midfield to forward.

Whether they can achieve this within the first year of the rules update remains to be seen, with the first answers expected during the first pre-season test from February 23-25. The season kicks off March 20 in Bahrain.

What are the changes for F1 2022?

The rule changes, which have been in the works for a long time and were originally planned for 2021 before being delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, mean we have a whole new generation of cars.

The concept is, in essence, a streamlined yet striking new race car following a radical aerodynamic overhaul.

Watch Formula 1 World Champion Max Verstappen take part in an epic alpine spectacle on ice in the Red Bull RB8 car, with the Dutchman alongside ice speed star Franky Zorn.

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Watch Formula 1 World Champion Max Verstappen take part in an epic alpine spectacle on ice in the Red Bull RB8 car, with the Dutchman alongside ice speed star Franky Zorn.

Watch Formula 1 World Champion Max Verstappen take part in an epic alpine spectacle on ice in the Red Bull RB8 car, with the Dutchman alongside ice speed star Franky Zorn.

The main changes are:

  • A ground effect floor. The 2022 car has two long tunnels under the floor which create “ground effect”, meaning there is more suction under the car to pull it down to the tarmac, while also ensuring that greater downforce is generated under the car. The concept was popular in the 1970s and 1980s in F1.
  • A simplified front wing and a new sharp rear wing. These not only look great, but the all-new parts of the 2022 cars have been designed to stop sending airflow outward, narrowing it instead. The curved rear wing still has DRS, although it may be less punchy.
  • 18 inch tires with wheel fins. Another returning addition, the bigger tires are aesthetically pleasing while they should also improve the cars handling. Fins were added to help direct air away from the rear wing.

What will the changes do?

New cars don’t just look many different, but they should have a marked effect on the track product, with more exciting and competitive wheel-to-wheel racing.

They are designed with a focus on shifting the aerodynamic focus of the fenders to the underside of the car, making it easier to follow the car ahead and thus improving racing.

F1 estimates are that the 2021 cars have lost 35% of their downforce in the three car lengths from the car in front and nearly 50% in a single car length. You may have heard the words “dirty air”.

The new cars? They claim to reduce these numbers to just 4 and 18% respectively.

“They rely a lot more on air going very quickly under the car, which sucks the car onto the ground and gives what we like to call ground effect,” Sky F1’s Ted Kravitz said.

“You have created a void,” added Anthony Davidson. “There’s a suction to the ground, and you rely less on the wings to give you rear grip, and more on the ground.”

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